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A Beaver County bitcoin mine is hiring — no training needed


In the shadow of a former steel mill, the sound of whirring computers is the sound of money.The Midland Bitcoin mine isn’t your average mine.”It’s digital currency mining,” Mawson Enterprises COO Liam Wilson said. “We use our computing power, as opposed to drilling into the ground and looking for oil or gas or what have you. We’re using our computing power to mine for Bitcoin.”Metal trailers with triangular hoods on the side house hundreds of computers solving algorithms.”Basically, we are providing our computer power, and by providing our computing power to a network, we are rewarded with Bitcoin,” Wilson said. “So that’s where I guess the term ‘mining’ comes from. If you dig in the ground and you hit oil, then you’re rewarded in oil. We’re providing our computing power, so we’re rewarded in Bitcoin.”Wilson explained cryptocurrency this way: “It’s basically you and I transacting, as opposed to Chase Bank or a third party taking that transaction in the middle. It’s only you and I doing it. So, the fees are very, very low.”Mawson Infrastructure Group was born in Australia but is now headquartered in Midland to take advantage of something unique to the region: The Beaver Valley Power Station, a nuclear power plant. Bitcoin mining requires more electricity than any other industry, according to Wilson.”The U.S. has some amazing power resources as well that we simply don’t have in Australia,” Wilson said. “And, I guess, the main reason we’re here in Midland is the nuclear power.” Wilson called nuclear power “fantastic.””It’s safe, it’s carbon-free. There’s not a lot of impact on the environment, and there’s an abundance of it, particularly in Pennsylvania,” Wilson said.Mawson, which is traded on the Nasdaq, is also developing a similar Bitcoin mine in Sharon, Mercer County. So far this year, Mawson has generated 1,231 Bitcoin.With this growth, the company wants to hire site engineers, network engineers and maintenance technicians. “I basically check all the uptime of all the devices on site,” said Dylan McKnight, describing his work as a Mawson network engineer. “I’ll make sure the network’s healthy. If it’s not, nothing on the site actually works, so I check each individual failure point.”Not only does Mawson hire locally, but Wilson also said that they “don’t ask (applicants) for any training. They basically just need to come and have a positive attitude and we can teach them everything on the job.”He called this “a big part of our ethos.”The Pittsburgh Regional Alliance, an arm of the Allegheny Conference on Economic Development, works with companies like Mawson to see if locating in western Pennsylvania makes sense.Pittsburgh Regional Alliance President Mark Thomas said he thinks “we’ll see more jobs like this because there’s just so much innovation happening in manufacturing that there is no existing workforce that is prepared for those kind of jobs.”As Thomas spoke, behind him was part of Pittsburgh’s past and current economic driver: Coal.Follow the Ohio River to Midland, and you can see the future — industries like cryptocurrency.

In the shadow of a former steel mill, the sound of whirring computers is the sound of money.

The Midland Bitcoin mine isn’t your average mine.

“It’s digital currency mining,” Mawson Enterprises COO Liam Wilson said. “We use our computing power, as opposed to drilling into the ground and looking for oil or gas or what have you. We’re using our computing power to mine for Bitcoin.”

Metal trailers with triangular hoods on the side house hundreds of computers solving algorithms.

“Basically, we are providing our computer power, and by providing our computing power to a network, we are rewarded with Bitcoin,” Wilson said. “So that’s where I guess the term ‘mining’ comes from. If you dig in the ground and you hit oil, then you’re rewarded in oil. We’re providing our computing power, so we’re rewarded in Bitcoin.”

Wilson explained cryptocurrency this way: “It’s basically you and I transacting, as opposed to Chase Bank or a third party taking that transaction in the middle. It’s only you and I doing it. So, the fees are very, very low.”

Mawson Infrastructure Group was born in Australia but is now headquartered in Midland to take advantage of something unique to the region: The Beaver Valley Power Station, a nuclear power plant.

Bitcoin mining requires more electricity than any other industry, according to Wilson.

“The U.S. has some amazing power resources as well that we simply don’t have in Australia,” Wilson said. “And, I guess, the main reason we’re here in Midland is the nuclear power.”

Wilson called nuclear power “fantastic.”

“It’s safe, it’s carbon-free. There’s not a lot of impact on the environment, and there’s an abundance of it, particularly in Pennsylvania,” Wilson said.

Mawson, which is traded on the Nasdaq, is also developing a similar Bitcoin mine in Sharon, Mercer County. So far this year, Mawson has generated 1,231 Bitcoin.

With this growth, the company wants to hire site engineers, network engineers and maintenance technicians.

“I basically check all the uptime of all the devices on site,” said Dylan McKnight, describing his work as a Mawson network engineer. “I’ll make sure the network’s healthy. If it’s not, nothing on the site actually works, so I check each individual failure point.”

Not only does Mawson hire locally, but Wilson also said that they “don’t ask (applicants) for any training. They basically just need to come and have a positive attitude and we can teach them everything on the job.”

He called this “a big part of our ethos.”

The Pittsburgh Regional Alliance, an arm of the Allegheny Conference on Economic Development, works with companies like Mawson to see if locating in western Pennsylvania makes sense.

Pittsburgh Regional Alliance President Mark Thomas said he thinks “we’ll see more jobs like this because there’s just so much innovation happening in manufacturing that there is no existing workforce that is prepared for those kind of jobs.”

As Thomas spoke, behind him was part of Pittsburgh’s past and current economic driver: Coal.

Follow the Ohio River to Midland, and you can see the future — industries like cryptocurrency.



Read More: A Beaver County bitcoin mine is hiring — no training needed

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